Truth Frequency Radio


Jun 06, 2020

Kampusch, born February 1988 in Vienna, was kidnapped in 1998 by communications engineer Wolfgang Priklopil and held captive in the basement of his house for eight and a half years.

Natascha Kampusch

Kampusch, who was born in Vienna on February 17, 1988, was kidnapped in 1998 by communications engineer Wolfgang Priklopil and held captive in the basement of his house for eight and a half years. After 3,096 days she managed to escape and Priklopil took his own life. The “Kampusch case” received worldwide attention and was accompanied by many investigative mishaps.

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He is a mastermind of the turquoise and blue government. He knows how to wear down SPÖ government partners. Well want

Gernot Blümel

to the Vienna City Hall. A preview of the election campaign

From the office window of Gernot Blümel you can see the Vienna City Hall over the Volksgarten. Here on Ballhausplatz, the Chancellery Minister, with responsibility for Europe, art and media, turns the big wheels of politics. His topics these days are Brexit and the controversial ban on masking on the Internet. The State Opera (with its scandalous grievances in the Ballet Academy) as well as the ORF and its future funding fall under its political responsibility. The coalition partner FPÖ has raised the abolition of GIS fees to the flag issue. So far, the ÖVP has not been in such a hurry. It is possible that the coalition coordinators will need to work again – a role that Blümel has also taken on for his party. And yet he wants to move to the other side of the Ringstrasse, from federal politics to city politics. From the excitement about Brexit to the excitement about pedestrian zones and the pushing back of the cars in the city. Can you want that?

“That was my goal from the start when I took over ÖVP Vienna,” asserts Blümel. “You shape the immediate reality of people’s lives. There is no more direct political work than as a mayor, and that in a metropolis of millions.” Next year the Vienna City Council will be re-elected. As state party leader, Blümel is the logical top candidate for the now Turquoise. The ÖVP achieved a mere nine percent in 2015. So it can almost only get better.

© Matt Observe / News Gernot Blümel

“I will miss him”, his blue face to face Norbert Hofer is already shedding crocodile tears.a 123 Blümel replies that he will do that “one hundred percent”. “It was or is an extremely trust-oriented and pragmatic cooperation. If the personal level fits, then you can solve major political problems. If this level is broken and you structurally distrust each other, then even the smallest challenge becomes unsolvable,” explains Blümelden Everyday coalition. Everyone knows about the pain limits of the other. “Vice versa, they are always exceeded when you believe that the other person has lost understanding of you. It is very important that you have a certain empathy for the other person’s positions. That does not mean that you share the position , but you know how far you can go without making life too difficult for the other. ” You treat each other to political success, says Blümel.

Not like it used to be with the SPÖ, when people were sick to the core and the constant concern was to negotiate things away from each other. “They boasted about what did not come and what compromise they made. The compromise democracy has clearly been exaggerated.” The FPÖ gets the Papamonat, the ÖVP concessions to the economy. When it comes to against immigrants, one often agrees anyway.

The red lines

Even at the beginning of April, when the delimitation of the FPÖ from the identities was questionable, the conflict was quickly resolved after FPÖ boss Heinz-Christian Strache had asserted that one did not want to have anything to do with their ideas. “That was a red line,” says Blümel, “the Chancellor made it clear, and the FPÖ complied with it. In addition, it will not pose any major problems in cooperation. If it is done as announced.”

But Kurz and his team could not have been surprised by the coalition partner’s problems of demarcation. We know the FPÖ and its individual cases – and very often remained silent. Whether the red line runs where the ÖVP is in danger of being internationally damaged by blue tendencies towards the right wing? “No,” says Blümel, “It’s about a basic attitude, they just have a horrible set of thoughts that we don’t want to have anything to do with.”

Criticism such as that of the Dutch EU Commissioner Frans Timmermans that the turquoise-blue coalition does not know who is controlling whom, Blümel brushes off the table: “He is in the election campaign and top candidate for the Social Democrats. I also know him in terms of factual cooperation. There he would never say such a thing. “

At the federal level, Blümel is a power factor. He is sitting in the coalition’s engine room, all important government decisions are also taken over his desk, a few meters further in the Federal Chancellery resides Sebastian Kurz, in whose political followers Blümel has been moving for years. He clears the unpleasant things out of the way for Kurz and takes over when Kurz does not want to be in the limelight for tactical reasons. Like on that Vienna election evening in 2015, when the ÖVP under Manfred Juraczka achieved the worst result in its history.

Pale turquoise handwriting

It quickly became clear that something was going to happen at the top of the party. At that time, Kurz was foreign minister and young hope for pretty much all vacant positions in the ÖVP. Blümel was Secretary General of the Federal ÖVP. In the corridors of the party headquarters one whispered that “Sebastian” must now take over. He came, let the goblet pass by elegantly and pushed his friend Blümel through to Reinhold Mitterlehner, who was already taken by surprise. A suicide mission, many thought at the time. The smart, but until then rather inconspicuous young man, like all his predecessors, would probably be smashed into Döblinger regiments and district emperors. The real head of the Vienna ÖVP has been sitting in the city’s economic chamber for years.

But Blümel and Kurz put things differently: First, the federal ÖVP was taken over by Kurz, then it went on to the Chancellery, Blümel received the important government post and thus has a media presence that his predecessors in the Vienna ÖVP could only wish for. In a part-time job, Blümel rejuvenated the functionaries in Vienna and colored them in turquoise. Only Blumel’s socks, which he prefers to wear, are even more turquoise. And Vienna should still be, he hopes. Strictly speaking, the ÖVP and the FPÖ also have a common goal in the Vienna election: to smash this red bastion.

A year and a half before the election, Blümel still has the same problem in Vienna that he otherwise prefers to pose to the opposition parties at federal level: In addition to an omnipresent government force, a nine percent party is barely visible. And so he says what one hears from the others at national level: “I would like our topics that we play in Vienna to receive the same attention. It doesn’t matter whether it is the high-rise on Heumarkt or our urban development concept that we recently presented to have.” But even Blümel’s own social media channels convey more the minister than the Viennese local politician. When asked whether voters with an average interest even perceive him as the head of the ÖVP, he seems a little irritated: “I think yes, the polls give a clear picture that this will become even stronger in the election campaign. The media presence of state politicians is not that broad, so it helps that I have an exposed federal function. ” From this federal function, Blümel uses pinpricks against the opponents in Vienna. As Minister of Culture, he is involved in the debate about the threatened world cultural heritage of Vienna’s inner city and stands on the side of opponents of the high-rise plans for the Heumarkt. The proven election campaign topic of migration is keeping Blümel simmering from the government bench. He refers to the German classes that have been introduced and to the minimum income, which is heavily criticized by all aid organizations: “There is a lot of trouble where we on the part of the federal government are tackling the problems that we can solve. A lot of things take a long time in Vienna not been attacked, we don’t want to turn a blind eye to it. “

New topics, old enemy images

But immigration alone will not be enough in Vienna. Badly talking the city offensively only works to a limited extent, because it works for most people. So what will the turquoise election manifesto be? “We agree that Vienna is a beautiful city. And we also agree that being beautiful is not enough. If you ask the Viennese whether there is enough going on with the big problems, you will hardly get the answer that that is that’s how it is, “says Blümel. He lists over-indebtedness, North Hospital, Heumarkt, minimum income.

Blümel does not want to let go of the fact that the SPÖ under Michael Ludwig, with the “Vienna Bonus” for people who have been here for a long time, was better able to secure the party’s right flank than long-term mayor Michael Häupl. “To be honest, I don’t see the SPÖ’s clear line here: blinking a bit to the right, doing a bit to the left – or vice versa. But well, that’s up to the SPÖ strategists Looking at the top candidate Hebein, I don’t know where to position yourself differently than before. In the area of ​​minimum income, to say that you are suing the law in principle or you are not implementing it, that is very absurd. “

But, says the still minister, he would rather focus on other issues: the city debt, for example. The fact that City Councilor for Finance Peter Hanke wants to present a budget with a zero deficit in 2020 does not interfere with campaign tones: “I always heard that from Ms. Brauer (City Councilor until 2018), but it never happened. Apparently, he’s in a good tradition.” And the ÖVP wants to prove its talent for urban planning before the election. With a development concept for the Handelskai, for example. “If you drive along there, you will by definition not feel comfortable. It doesn’t have to be like that. In other metropolises with millions of inhabitants, living by the water is a privilege, a huge opportunity. When asked about the best places in Vienna, Blümel immediately mentions the Steinhof grounds: “This is an overall structure of architecture from 1900 that is unparalleled. I think it is absurd to consider whether to divide it up and sell it to the highest bidder. That’s why we have one Preliminary examination request sent to Unesco as to whether it is in principle worthy of protection. ” Blümel, on the other hand, wants to be less strict about shop opening times: “What about tourist zones in Vienna? We are the only cosmopolitan city where there are none. Every skiing village in Tyrol is allowed to do more.”

But how likely is it that plans will become reality? Dear Vice Mayor under Michael Ludwig or under Heinz-Christian Strache? “Preferably mayor” is the answer – which is rather unlikely with around 16 percent in surveys. “It is most likely,” admits Blümel, “that the SPÖ will provide the mayor again. Everything else is speculation.” If the ÖVP in Vienna forms a coalition with the SPÖ, will there be a clash with the blues in the federal government? The SPÖ could no longer rage so easily against Sebastian Kurz if it rules in Vienna with his closest confidante.

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically.

More on this ▶

NEWS FROM THE NETWORK

Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at)

New access (yachtrevue.at)

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Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto.at)

In the new trend: Shock-Down – how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (Trend.at)

The 35 best family series to laugh and feel good (tv-media.at)

E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

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More than 20 years ago, life took off

Natascha Kampusch

a tragic turning point, 13 years ago today Natascha managed to escape. As a now 31-year-old she looks back on her ordeal and shows one thing above all else: strength, courage and confidence.

Natascha Kampusch was 10 years old when her life took a dramatic turn. On the way to the elementary school on Brioschiweg, the child is dragged into a van. Her kidnapper, Wolfgang Priklopil, keeps the girl prisoner in a cellar dungeon in his house in Strasshof in Lower Austria on the Nordbahn.

© APA / ROLAND SCHLAGER A police officer is standing on Monday, September 4th, 2006, on the premises of the school complex on Brioschiweg in Vienna-Donaustadt, where Natascha Kampusch also went to school until she was kidnapped.

Natascha Kampusch lived in captivity for eight years. Exposed to her tormentor, sexually abused, serving as a slave.

© apa / STAMBERG View of the property and the house of Wolfgang Priklopil at Heinestrasse 60 in Strasshof, taken on August 29, 2006.

Read here: Priklopil’s shocking diary

In the summer of 2006, the then 18-year-old managed to escape. When Wolfgang Přiklopil managed to escape, the 44-year-old threw himself in front of a train in Vienna – he died instantly.

© apa / BUNDESKRIMINALAMT The passport of the kidnapper of Natascha Kampusch, Wolfgang Priklopil

It is a long, arduous struggle back into reality for Natascha Kampusch. But the young woman does not give up. In an interview with News from 2016, Kampusch emphasizes that she wants to step out of the victim role, actively, from within. “I want to develop myself” is her new motto. And: “I don’t want to be ousted.”

© Video: News

You read the whole interview

here

.

With freedom came aggression

“When we regained freedom, it was not all over,” said Natascha Kampusch in an interview. The former kidnapping victim was the target of aggression.

“I was brave from the moment of my self-liberation, but in the meantime my courage was thwarted in public and especially in published opinion. There were phases when I thought it was better to withdraw. Maybe that was, in the In retrospect, brave too, “said Natascha Kampusch in an interview with News 2017.

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