Truth Frequency Radio
Oct 21, 2013

world-peace-psychology-war-nonviolence-mutual-respect-truth-frequency-radio-chris-geo-sheree-geo-alternative-media-news-informationScience Daily

In a new review of how psychology research has illuminated the causes of war and violence, three political psychologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst say this understanding can and should be used to promote peace and overturn the belief that violent conflict is inevitable.

Writing in the current special “peace psychology” issue of American Psychologist, lead author Bernhard Leidner, Linda Tropp and Brian Lickel of UMass Amherst’s Psychology of Peace and Violence program say that if social psychology research focuses only on how to soften the negative consequences of war and violence, “it would fall far short of its potential and value for society.”

“In summarizing psychological perspectives on the conditions and motivations that underlie violent conflict,” says Tropp, “we find that psychology’s contributions can extend beyond understanding the origins and nature of violence to promote nonviolence and peace.” She adds, “We oppose the view that war is inevitable and argue that understanding the psychological roots of conflict can increase the likelihood of avoiding violence as a way to resolve conflicts with others.”

Political leaders can be crucial in showing people different paths and alternatives to violent confrontation, the researchers point out. Leidner mentions Nelson Mandela, a leader who “offered South Africans an example of how to deal with the legacy of apartheid without resorting to further violence by making statements such as, ‘If you want to make peace with your enemy, you have to work with your enemy. Then he becomes your partner.'”

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