Truth Frequency Radio


Oct 03, 2012

US polar bear researcher cleared of scientific misconduct

Charles Monnett, who oversaw much of the government’s work in the Arctic, was investigated over alleged use of false data

Week in wildlife : Polar bears are shown in this undated photograph from UCLA

The Obama administration has wound up its controversial investigation of a government polar bear researcher without finding any evidence of scientific wrongdoing, campaign groups said late Friday.

However, the scientist, Charles Monnett, who was the first to draw attention to the dangers to polar bears in a warming Arctic, was reprimanded for forwarding official email to a local government official and a fellow researcher at the University of Alaska without prior authorisation.

Campaign groups described the findings as a victory for Monnett, who until last year oversaw much of the government’s scientific work in the Arctic. It was also an embarrassment for the Obama administration, whose two-and-a-half-year investigation uncovered no evidence of major wrongdoing.

“This has been a vindication of Dr Monnett in that they found no scientific misconduct or anything related to his scientific work that merited any sort of discipline or personnel action,” said Jeff Ruch, director of Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, which had led the defence of Monnett.

But he said the official reprimand, though minor in terms of disciplinary action, was sobering. “It reads as if it was motivated by attempts during the Obama years to clog leaks and root out environmental dissidents inside the department of interior having to do with Arctic drilling.”

Until mid-2011, Monnett oversaw much of the research on Arctic wildlife, managing $50m in scientific projects, for the government agency overseeing oil drilling in Alaska, the bureau of ocean energy management, or BOEM.

Peer said Monnett was told informally on Thursday he could return to his scientific role.

The reprimand will be expunged from his record in two years or less, the interior department said in a letter to Monnett.

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Fraud in scientific research papers growing at alarming rate

A review of retractions in medical and biological peer-reviewed journals finds the percentage of studies that had to be withdrawn because of scientific misconduct has jumped several-fold since the mid-1970s.

By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press / October 2, 2012

In this 2010 file photo, Dr. Andrew Wakefield, who authored a fraudulent paper linking certain vaccinations to autism, speaks in Chicago. Fraud in scientific research, while still rare, is growing at an alarming rate, a new study finds. A review of retractions in medical and biological peer-reviewed journals finds the percentage of studies that had to be retracted because of scientific misconduct has jumped several-fold since the mid-1970s.

Charles Rex Arbogas/AP

WASHINGTON

A new study finds that fraud in scientific research is growing at a troubling rate, even though it remains rare overall.

A review of retractions in medical and biological peer-reviewed journals finds the percentage of studies that had to be withdrawn because of scientific misconduct has jumped several-fold since the mid-1970s.

The study says fraud or suspected fraud is by far the biggest reason for retractions, outweighing errors and plagiarism.

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