Jul 22, 2014

http://tfrlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/congress.jpgI stayed up late last night watching a movie I’d never seen before – “The Congress”. I wanted to write an article reviewing it immediately, but the themes and the storyline are just so IN YOUR FACE and so chilling and so (ultimately) what the elite want to become of us, I’m having a very difficult time putting into words how I feel after watching it. I even had to get a full night’s sleep before I could even gather my thoughts enough to write about it.

It was like a DMT trip that was just “too much”, you know? The first half of it was pretty benign (albeit a little indicative of where Hollywood is headed in terms of computer-generated capacity), but it’s the last half of the movie that gets ya.

The last half of the film was basically premised upon a book that the Pentagon took great notice of back in the 70’s called The Futurological Congress that described hallucinogens called “benignomizers” being used on the public through the water supply to quell riots and create pacified zombies who are too busy playing out their fantasies in a hallucinogenic world to rise up against the elite.

By this time. however, the CIA  (through project MK-Ultra)had already used children and mental patients to test LSD, DMT, and other hallucinogens for their use in interrogations, and had already infiltrated college campuses around the country to use them on the anti-Vietnam protesters. They also used hookers to get unwitting johns to come back to their bordello so they could dose them with LSD, as well as gave it to starving artists who completely lost touch with reality and became http://tfrlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/045-0216052612-mk_ultra_girl_c1961a.jpgperpetually insane. So, it’s no wonder why they were so interested in the so-called “Sci-Fi” genre – They wanted to take the “fiction” out of “science fiction”.

In 1951, it was renamed Project Artichoke, then MK-ULTRA under Deputy CIA Director Richard Helms in 1953. It aimed to control human behavior through psychedelic and hallucinogenic drugs, electroshock, radiation, graphology, paramilitary techniques, and psychological/sociological/anthropological methods, among others – a vast open-field of mind experimentation trying anything that might work, legal or otherwise on willing and unwitting subjects.
Ongoing at different times were 149 sub-projects in 80 US and Canadian universities, medical centers and three prisons, involving 185 researchers, 15 foundations and numerous drug companies. Everything was top secret, and most records later destroyed, yet FOIA suits salvaged thousands of pages with documented evidence of the horrific experiments and their effects on human subjects.
Most were unwitting guinea pigs, and those consenting were misinformed of the dangers. James Stanley was a career soldier when given LSD in 1958 along with 1,000 other military “volunteers.” They suffered hallucinations, memory loss, incoherence, and severe personality changes. Stanley exhibited uncontrollable violence. It destroyed his family, impeded his working ability, and he never knew why until the Army asked him to participate in a follow-up study.

http://tfrlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/The-Congress.jpgOther movie reviewers tended to focus on the “Robin Wright” aspect of it – which is the former Princess Bride becoming too old to do meaningful acting gigs anymore and who is forced to “Scan” herself into “Miramount” (a cleverly-designed company name derived from “Paramount” and “Miramax”) computer servers and “retire” in peace, allowing the company to create CG movies starring her for the next 20 rsz_the-congress-still-3years.

Robin Wright plays an aging actress with a reputation for being fickle and unreliable, so much so that nobody is willing to offer her roles anymore. She agrees to sell the movie rights to her digital image to Miramount Studios (a portmanteau of Miramax and Paramount Studios) in exchange for a hefty sum and the promise to never act again. After her body is digitally scanned, the studio will be able to make films starring her using only computer-generated characters.

Twenty years later, her character attends the Futurological Congress, which showcases Miramount’s new technology that allows people to transform themselves into animated avatars. In this mutable illusory state, they can become anything they want to be, be it a perfectly seductive goddess or their favorite action hero. Miramount wants to sell her image to punters, allowing them to transform themselves into her.

She agrees to the deal but has a crisis of conscience, and does not believe she or anyone else should be turned into a product. She publicly voices her views, enraging the hosts of the Congress. Shortly afterwards, the Congress is attacked by rebels ideologically opposed to the technology. Robin hallucinates her own execution.

The doctors decide that Robin is so ill, she must be frozen until a time when a treatment for her mental illness is found. She is revived many years later.

rsz_the-congressAlthough I could see the symbolism of Hollywood’s mind control of actors in the film, I was not nearly as impressed with that particular angle. What left the film’s impression on me the most was the way that the director honed in on the fact that none of us want to really be here as our pure selves, and would much rather be someone else, someone faster, smarter, better-looking, etc.

I only know too well, living in a body that suffers from a disorder that makes my collagen like old, stretched-out rubber bands. This makes my joints constantly dislocate, and means I can’t do 70% of the “fun” things in life that others are enjoying. If I didn’t know better, someone like me, if approached with a magical elixir to transform myself into Superwoman or a  female "The Congress"tennis star, would probably agree to it.

This is exactly the dystopian future that the director of the film wanted to get across, not the idea that some poor actress is going to be turned into a chemical cocktail that other people can drink in a milkshake. It’s not even about the fact that this semi-elderly woman is being forced into a world reminiscent of The Yellow Submarine that she cannot escape. It’s the fact that other people (who have no socioeconomic backup to keep them safe and taken care of while they’re tripping) are conned into this world simply because movie production companies in bed with Big Pharma goaded them into it. It’s even unclear if the people entering this animated realm know that they can’t leave the “chemical party” when they enter it. That means that the end result – zombies in NYC shuffling along, completely oblivious to the dystopic hellhole they’re really living in – was planned that way.

Most movie reviewers have almost flat-out refused to cover this particular aspect of the film, but I chose to research it head-on.

http://tfrlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Futurological%2BCongress.jpgAs it turns out, the Pentagon had a lot of interest in the 1971 novel The Futuristic Congress:

The book opens at the eponymous congress, a light-heartedly grim Malthusian parody of the state of the world. A riot breaks out and the hero, Ijon Tichy, is hit by various psychoactive drugs that were put into the drinking water supply lines by the government to pacify riots. Ijon and a few others escape to the safety of a sewer beneath the Hilton where the congress was being held, and in the sewer he goes through a series of hallucinations and false awakenings which cause him to be confused about whether or not what’s happening around him is real. Finally, he believes that he falls asleep and wakes up many years later. The main part of the book follows Ijon’s adventures in the future world — a world where everyone takes hallucinogenic drugs, and hallucinations have replaced reality.

The Pentagon’s Secret
Psychopharmacological Warfare Program

 

By Edward Hammond
7-3-2

In The Futurological Congress (1971), Polish writer Stanislaw Lem portrayed a future in which disobedience is controlled with hypothetical mind-altering chemicals dubbed “benignimizers”. Lem’s fictional work opens with the frightening story of a police and military biochemical attack on protesters outside of an international scientific convention. As the environment becomes saturated with hallucinogenic agents, in Lem’s tale the protesters (and bystanders) descend into chaos, overcome by delusions and feelings of complacency, self-doubt, and even love.

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If the Pentagon’s Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate (JNLWD) has its way, Lem may be remembered as a prophet.

http://tfrlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/clubdrugs_substance.jpgThe Advantages and Limitations of Calmatives for Use as a Non-Lethal Technique, a 49 page report obtained last week by the Sunshine Project under US information freedom law, has revealed a shocking Pentagon program that is researching psychopharmacological weapons. Based on “extensive review conducted on the medical literature and new developments in the pharmaceutical industry”, the report concludes that “the development and use of [psychopharmacological weapons] is achievable and desirable.” These mind-altering weapons violate international agreements on chemical and biological warfare as well as human rights. Some of the techniques discussed in the report have already been used by the US in the “War on Terrorism”.

The team, which is based at the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University, is assessing weaponization of a number of psychiatric and anesthetic pharmaceuticals as well as “club drugs” (such as the “date rape drug” GHB). According to the report, “the choice administration route, whether application to drinking water, topical administration to the skin, an aerosol spray inhalation route, or a drug filled rubber bullet, among others, will depend on the environment.”

The environments identified are specific military and civil situations, including “hungry refugees that are excited over the distribution of food”, “a prison setting”, an “agitated population” and “hostage situations”. At times, the JNLWD team’s report veers very close to defining dissent as a psychological disorder.

http://tfrlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/mdma.jpgThe drugs that Lem called “benignimizers” are called “calmatives” by the military. Some calmatives were weaponized by the Cold War adversaries, including BZ, described by those who have used it as “the ultimate bad trip”. Calmatives were supposed to have been deleted from military stockpiles following the adoption of the Chemical Weapons Convention in 1993, which bans any chemical weapon that can cause death, temporary incapacitation, or permanent harm to humans or animals.

Calmative is military, not medical, terminology. In more familiar medical language, most of the drugs under consideration are central nervous system depressants. Most are synthetic, some are natural. They include opiates (morphine-type drugs) and benzodiazpines, such as Valium (diazepam).

Antidepressants are also of great interest to the research team, which is looking for drugs like Prozac (fluoxetine) and Zoloft (sertraline) that are faster acting. Biochemicals and Treaties: Many of the proposed drugs can be considered both chemical and biological weapons banned by the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC), and the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC).

As a practical matter, biological and chemical “calmatives” must be addressed together. As the agents are explicitly intended for military use, and are intended to incapacitate their victims, they do not fall under the CWC’s domestic riot control agent exemption. Toxic products of living agents – such as the neurotoxin botulinum – are considered both chemical and biological agents.

Any weapons use of neurotransmitters or substances mimicking their action is similarly covered by both arms control treaties. The researchers have developed a massive calmatives database and are following biomedical research on mechanisms of drug addiction, pain relief, and other areas of research on cognition-altering biochemicals. For example, the JNLWD team is tracking research on cholecystokinin, a neurotransmitter that causes panic attacks in healthy people and is linked to psychiatric disorders.

http://tfrlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/ghb-voorpagina-web.jpgPowerful Drugs: The drugs have hallucinogenic and other effects, including apnea (stopped breathing), coma, and death. One class of drugs under consideration are fentanyls. The report’s cover features a diagram of fentanyl.

According to the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the biological effects of fentanyls “are indistinguishable from those of heroin, with the exception that the fentanyls may be hundreds of times more potent.” The report says that the drugs’ profound effects may make it necessary to “check for the occasional person who may stop breathing (many medical reasons in the unhealthy, the elderly, and very young…”, as well as victims who “‘go to sleep’ in positions that obstruct their airway”.

Failed Drugs: The report points out that pharmaceutical candidates that fail because of excessive side-effects might be desirable for use as weapons: “Often, an unwanted side-effect… will terminate the development of a promising new pharmaceutical compound. However, in the variety of situations in which non-lethal techniques are used, there may be less need to be concerned with unattractive side-effects… Perhaps, the ideal calmative has already been synthesized and is awaiting renewed interest from its manufacturer.”

http://tfrlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/valium.jpgChemical Cocktails: As of March 2002, the team was researching a mix of pepper spray (“OC”) and an unidentified calmative agent. Pepper spray is the most powerful chemical crowd control agent in use, and has been associated with numerous deaths. Adding a pharmacological “calmative” to OC would create a hideous concoction.

The report prioritizes Valium and Precedex (dexmeditomidine) for weaponization, and it is possible that these are the agents that could be mixed with OC. The researchers also suggest mixing ketamine with other drugs (see below). The chemical cocktail proposals bear a resemblance to South Africa’s apartheid-era weapons research, whose director claimed under oath to have attempted to develop a BZ and cocaine mixture for use on government enemies.

Torture: Precedex is sedative approved for use in the US on patients hospitalized in intensive care units. The report draws attention to an “interesting phenomenon” related to Precedex use – the drug increases patients’ reaction to electrical shock. The researchers suggest sensitizing people by using Precedex on them, followed by use of electromagnetic weapons to “address effects on the few individuals where an average dose of the pharmacological agent did not have the desired effect.” Obviously, such a technique might be considered torture, and certainly could be used to torture. To add to hypnotic and delusional properties, the researchers suggest that psychopharmaceutical agents could be designed to have physical effects including headache and nausea, adding to their torture potential.

http://tfrlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/buspar.news3.pngThe researchers suggest that transdermal patches and transmucosal (through mucous membranes) formulations of Buspar (buspirone) under development by Bristol-Myers Squibb and TheraTech, Inc. “may be effective in a prison setting where there may have been a recent anxiety-provoking incident or confrontation.”

Use in the War on Terrorism: Of course, uncooperative or rioting prisoners would be extraordinarily unlikely to accept being drugged with a transdermal patch or most conventional means. Any such application of a “calmative” would likely be on individuals in shackles or a straightjacket. The US has admitted that it forcibly sedates Al-Qaida “detainees” held at the US base in Guantanamo, Cuba. Former JNLWD commander and retired Col. Andy Mazzara, who directs the Penn State team, says has he sent a “Science Advisor” to the US Navy to assist the War on Terrorism.

Modes of Delivery: A number of weaponization modes are discussed in the report. These include aerosol sprays, microencapsulation, and insidious methods such as introduction into potable water supplies and psychoactive chewing gum. JNLWD is investing in the development of microencapsulation technology, which involves creating granules of a minute quantity of agent coated with a hardened shell. Distributed on the ground, the shell breaks under foot and the agent is released. A new mortar round being developed could deliver thousands of the minute granules per round.

The team concludes that new delivery methods under development by the pharmaceutical industry will be of great weapons value. These include new transdermal, transmucosal, and aerosol delivery methods. The report cites the relevance of a lollipop containing fentanyl used to treat children in severe pain, and notes that “the development of new pain-relieving opiate drugs capable of being administered via several routes is at the forefront of drug discovery”, concluding that new weapons could be developed from this pharmaceutical research.

http://tfrlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Psychiatric-Drugs.jpgDart Guns: The researchers express specific interest shooting humans with guns loaded with carfentanil darts. Carfentanil is a veterinary narcotic used to tranquilize large, dangerous animals such as bears and tigers. Anyone who has watched wildlife shows on television is familiar with the procedure. In the US, carfentanil is not approved for any use on human beings. It is an abused drug and a controlled substance. Under US law, first time offenders convicted of unlicensed possession of carfentanil can be punished by up to 20 years in prison and a $1 million fine.

Club Drugs: Most of the JNLWD team’s weapon candidates are controlled substances in most countries. Some are widely used legitimate pharmaceuticals that are also drugs of abuse, such as Valium and opiates. The Pentagon team advocates more research into the weapons potential of convulsants (which provoke seizures) and “club drugs”, the generally illegal substances used by some at “rave” and dance clubs. Among those in the military spotlight are ketamine (“Special K”), GHB (Gamma-hydroxybutrate, “liquid ecstasy”), and rohypnol (“Roofies”). The latter two in particular are called “date rape drugs” because of incidences of their use on victims of sexual and other crimes.

Most are DEA Schedule I or II narcotics that provoke hallucinations and can carry a sentence of life imprisonment. For example, according to the DEA, “Use of ketamine as a general anesthetic for humans has been limited due to adverse effects including delirium and hallucinations… Low doses produce vertigo, ataxia, slurred speech, slow reaction time, and euphoria. Intermediate doses produce disorganized thinking, altered body image, and a feeling of unreality with vivid visual hallucinations. High doses produce analgesia, amnesia, and coma.”

Edward Hammond is director of The Sunshine Project, based in Austin, Texas. He can be reached at: [email protected] Additional information, on relationships between these weapons and protection human rights, medical ethics, and drug research is forthcoming. A summary of the report is available on the Sunshine Project website. http://www.counterpunch.org/hammond0702.html

rsz_ketamine-for-depression-1018x1024http://tfrlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Tong-Brave-New-World.jpgThere was another book that caught the attention of the futuristic ideologues of it’s time – The Fabian Society – at the turn of the 20th century: Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley. 

From the lift the Savage stepped out into the midst of them. But his mind was elsewhere–with death, with his grief, and his remorse; mechanically, without consciousness of what he was doing, he began to shoulder his way through the crowd.

“Who are you pushing? Where do you think you’re going?”

High, low, from a multitude of separate throats, only two voices squeaked or growled. Repeated indefinitely, as though by a train of mirrors, two faces, one a hairless and freckled moon haloed in orange, the other a thin, beaked bird-mask, stubbly with two days’ beard, turned angrily towards him. Their words and, in his ribs, the sharp nudging of elbows, broke through his unawareness.

He woke once more to external reality, looked round him, knew what he saw–knew it, with a sinking sense of horror and disgust, for the recurrent delirium of his days and nights, the nightmare of swarming indistinguishable sameness. Twins, twins. … Like maggots they had swarmed defilingly over the mystery of Linda’s death. Maggots again, but larger, full grown, they now crawled across his grief and his repentance. He halted and, with bewildered and horrified eyes, stared round him at the khaki mob, in the midst of which, overtopping it by a full head, he stood. “How many goodly creatures are there here!” The singing words mocked him derisively. “How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world …”

Soma distribution!” shouted a loud voice. “In good order, please. Hurry up there.”

A door had been opened, a table and chair carried into the vestibule. The voice was that of a jaunty young Alpha, who had entered carrying a black iron cash-box. A murmur of satisfaction went up from the expectant twins. They forgot all about the Savage. Their attention was now focused on the black cash-box, which the young man had placed on the table, and was now in process of unlocking. The lid was lifted.

“Oo-oh!” said all the hundred and sixty-two simultaneously, as though they were looking at fireworks.

The young man took out a handful of tiny pill-boxes. “Now,” he said peremptorily, “step forward, please. One at a time, and no shoving.”

The Savage stood looking on. “O brave new world, O brave new world …” In his mind the singing words seemed to change their tone. They had mocked him through his misery and remorse, mocked him with how hideous a note of cynical derision! Fiendishly laughing, they had insisted on the low squalor, the nauseous ugliness of the nightmare. Now, suddenly, they trumpeted a call to arms. “O brave new world!” Miranda was proclaiming the possibility of loveliness, the possibility of transforming even the nightmare into something fine and noble. “O brave new world!” It was a challenge, a command.

“No shoving there now!” shouted the Deputy Sub-Bursar in a fury. He slammed down he lid of his cash-box. “I shall stop the distribution unless I have good behaviour.”

The Deltas muttered, jostled one another a little, and then were still. The threat had been effective. Deprivation of soma–appalling thought!

“That’s better,” said the young man, and reopened his cash-box.

Linda had been a slave, Linda had died; others should live in freedom, and the world be made beautiful. A reparation, a duty. And suddenly it was luminously clear to the Savage what he must do; it was as though a shutter had been opened, a curtain drawn back.

“Now,” said the Deputy Sub-Bursar.

Another khaki female stepped forward.

“Stop!” called the Savage in a loud and ringing voice. “Stop!”

He pushed his way to the table; the Deltas stared at him with astonishment.

“Ford!” said the Deputy Sub-Bursar, below his breath. “It’s the Savage.” He felt scared.

“Listen, I beg of you,” cried the Savage earnestly. “Lend me your ears …” He had never spoken in public before, and found it very difficult to express what he wanted to say. “Don’t take that horrible stuff. It’s poison, it’s poison.”

“I say, Mr. Savage,” said the Deputy Sub-Bursar, smiling propitiatingly. “Would you mind letting me …”

“Poison to soul as well as body.”

“Yes, but let me get on with my distribution, won’t you? There’s a good fellow.” With the cautious tenderness of one who strokes a notoriously vicious animal, he patted the Savage’s arm. “Just let me …”

“Never!” cried the Savage.

“But look here, old man …”

“Throw it all away, that horrible poison.”

The words “Throw it all away” pierced through the enfolding layers of incomprehension to the quick of the Delta’s consciousness. An angry murmur went up from the crowd.

“I come to bring you freedom,” said the Savage, turning back towards the twins. “I come …”

The Deputy Sub-Bursar heard no more; he had slipped out of the vestibule and was looking up a number in the telephone book.

http://tfrlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/take_a_soma_holiday___brave_new_world_by_corporalspycrab-d4ym6vv.png

“But do you like being slaves?” the Savage was saying as they entered the Hospital. His face was flushed, his eyes bright with ardour and indignation. “Do you like being babies? Yes, babies. Mewling and puking,” he added, exasperated by their bestial stupidity into throwing insults at those he had come to save. The insults bounced off their carapace of thick stupidity; they stared at him with a blank expression of dull and sullen resentment in their eyes. “Yes, puking!” he fairly shouted. Grief and remorse, compassion and duty–all were forgotten now and, as it were, absorbed into an intense overpowering hatred of these less than human monsters. “Don’t you want to be free and men? Don’t you even understand what manhood and freedom are?” Rage was making him fluent; the words came easily, in a rush. “Don’t you?” he repeated, but got no answer to his question. “Very well then,” he went on grimly. “I’ll teach you; I’ll make you be free whether you want to or not.” And pushing open a window that looked on to the inner court of the Hospital, he began to throw the little pill-boxes of soma tablets in handfuls out into the area.

For a moment the khaki mob was silent, petrified, at the spectacle of this wanton sacrilege, with amazement and horror.

“He’s mad,” whispered Bernard, staring with wide open eyes. “They’ll kill him. They’ll …” A great shout suddenly went up from the mob; a wave of movement drove it menacingly towards the Savage. “Ford help him!” said Bernard, and averted his eyes.

“Ford helps those who help themselves.” And with a laugh, actually a laugh of exultation, Helmholtz Watson pushed his way through the crowd.

“Free, free!” the Savage shouted, and with one hand continued to throw the soma into the area while, with the other, he punched the indistinguishable faces of his assailants. “Free!” And suddenly there was Helmholtz at his side–”Good old Helmholtz!”–also punching–”Men at last!”–and in the interval also throwing the poison out by handfuls through the open window. “Yes, men! men!” and there was no more poison left. He picked up the cash-box and showed them its black emptiness. “You’re free!”

Howling, the Deltas charged with a redoubled fury.

Hesitant on the fringes of the battle. “They’re done for,” said Bernard and, urged by a sudden impulse, ran forward to help them; then thought better of it and halted; then, ashamed, stepped forward again; then again thought better of it, and was standing in an agony of humiliated indecision–thinking that they might be killed if he didn’t help them, and that he might be killed if he did–when (Ford be praised!), goggle-eyed and swine-snouted in their gas-masks, in ran the police.

Bernard dashed to meet them. He waved his arms; and it was action, he was doing something. He shouted “Help!” several times, more and more loudly so as to give himself the illusion of helping. “Help! Help! HELP!”

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The policemen pushed him out of the way and got on with their work. Three men with spraying machines buckled to their shoulders pumped thick clouds of soma vapour into the air. Two more were busy round the portable Synthetic Music Box. Carrying water pistols charged with a powerful anæsthetic, four others had pushed their way into the crowd and were methodically laying out, squirt by squirt, the more ferocious of the fighters.

“Quick, quick!” yelled Bernard. “They’ll be killed if you don’t hurry. They’ll … Oh!” Annoyed by his chatter, one of the policemen had given him a shot from his water pistol. Bernard stood for a second or two wambling unsteadily on legs that seemed to have lost their bones, their tendons, their muscles, to have become mere sticks of jelly, and at last not even jelly-water: he tumbled in a heap on the floor.

Suddenly, from out of the Synthetic Music Box a Voice began to speak. The Voice of Reason, the Voice of Good Feeling. The sound-track roll was unwinding itself in Synthetic Anti-Riot Speech Number Two (Medium Strength). Straight from the depths of a non-existent heart, “My friends, my friends!” said the Voice so pathetically, with a note of such infinitely tender reproach that, behind their gas masks, even the policemen’s eyes were momentarily dimmed with tears, “what is the meaning of this? Why aren’t you all being happy and good together? Happy and good,” the Voice repeated. “At peace, at peace.” It trembled, sank into a whisper and momentarily expired. “Oh, I do want you to be happy,” it began, with a yearning earnestness. “I do so want you to be good! Please, please be good and …”

Two minutes later the Voice and the soma vapour had produced their effect. In tears, the Deltas were kissing and hugging one another–half a dozen twins at a time in a comprehensive embrace. Even Helmholtz and the Savage were almost crying. A fresh supply of pill-boxes was brought in from the Bursary; a new distribution was hastily made and, to the sound of the Voice’s richly affectionate, baritone valedictions, the twins dispersed, blubbering as though their hearts would break. “Good-bye, my dearest, dearest friends, Ford keep you! Good-bye, my dearest, dearest friends, Ford keep you. Good-bye my dearest, dearest …”

When the last of the Deltas had gone the policeman switched off the current. The angelic Voice fell silent.

“Will you come quietly?” asked the Sergeant, “or must we anæsthetize?” He pointed his water pistol menacingly.

“Oh, we’ll come quietly,” the Savage answered, dabbing alternately a cut lip, a scratched neck, and a bitten left hand.

 
The Giver Cover.gifAnother book (with a film coming soon based on it) written in the 1990’s (and primarily for children 10 years and older) called The Giver gives the same kind of themes:

The Giver is a 1993 American children’s novel by Lois Lowry. It is set in a society which is at first presented as a utopian society and gradually appears more and more dystopian. The novel follows a boy named Jonas through the twelfth year of his life. The society has eliminated pain and strife by converting to “Sameness,” a plan that has also eradicated emotional depth from their lives.

Jonas is selected to inherit the position of “Receiver of Memory,” the person who stores all the past memories of the time before Sameness, in case they are ever needed to aid in decisions that others lack the experience to make.

When Jonas meets the previous receiver—The “Giver”—he is confused in many ways. Additionally, the Giver is able to break some rules, such as turning off the speaker which listens to peoples’ conversations in their homes, and lying to people of the community.

As Jonas receives the memories from the Giver, he discovers the power of knowledge. The people in his community are happy because they do not know of a better life. They have been shielded from pain, sorrow, sickness, disease, hunger etc., but in doing so they have also lost out on many of the things that give life depth and meaning like sunshine, love, color, and music.

Thus, Jonas and the Giver face a dilemma. Should they offer the community a life full of love, variety, knowledge, and choice if it means losing the comforting safety inherent in their current life of innocence and order? Together they hatch a plan to share the full spectrum of what life has to offer with the whole community – a decision that will have immediate drastic consequences on everyone, but especially on Jonas himself.

These are just a few examples of what the elite want the New World Order to look like. Our only hope in the situation we’re in is to embrace our realities, and to govern our own thoughts and our own lives. Individual sovereignty is what they aim to destroy, and we must resist the urge to retreat into fantasy worlds they prepare for us.

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