Truth Frequency Radio
Nov 12, 2013

kenya-somalia-africa-al-shabaab-westgate-mall-attack-terrorism-joint-anti-task-force-truth-frequency-radio-chris-geo-sheree-geo-alternative-media-news-informationHomeland Security News Wire

Al-Shabaab’s attack on the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi last month has prompted security officials in Kenya and Somalia to consider the creation of a joint task force which will share intelligence, monitor activity, and track finances relating to terrorist groups operating in East Africa. Also under discussion is the establishment of a joint East African paramilitary force with jurisdiction throughout the region.

Al-Shabaab’s attack on the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi last month has prompted security officials in Kenya and Somalia to consider the creation of a joint task force which will share intelligence, monitor activity, and track finances relating to terrorist groups operating in East Africa.

Sabahi reports that al-Shabaab has proven it is capable of conducting attacks outside Somali borders, and that intelligence officials in Kenya and Somalia have concluded that they must now invest in the technology and personnel needed to counter the advancements in al-Shabaab’s tactics. “The terrorism problem has ballooned into a regional crisis and it calls for a sustained synergy among various security agencies,” said Jaw Kitiku, a retired Kenyan army colonel and the executive director of Security Research and Information Centre in Nairobi. He told Sabahi that “Time has come for the Kenyan and Somali governments to throw suspicion to the wind and develop a common watertight anti-terror strategy which, among other things, sets up an intelligence sharing network as one way of collaboration.”

Such collaboration will broaden information gathering and increase the speed of data processing and analysis resulting in more proactive actions against terrorism in the region.

The increasing use of social media by al-Shabaab to recruit, spread propaganda, train members, and plan operations means East Africa’s intelligence officials must advance their social media capabilities to track and monitor terror traffic on the Internet. “The cyber unit would basically do daily virtual patrols on the net. The selected officers would be the best in social media skills,” Kitiku said. “They would scout for threat indicators based on the language and tone of extremists’ posts and determine the origin and destination of terror messages.”

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