Truth Frequency Radio


Nov 02, 2012

Sewage, Bacteria, and Unknown Contaminants from Sandy May Soon Pollute Water

Lisa Garber
Activist Post

Threats continue to plague the victims of Superstorm Sandy, this time from the floodwater, air, and the very food in their refrigerators.

According to New Jersey Department of Health’s state epidemiologist, Tina Tan, floodwaters can be a noxious brew. “[They] potentially could contain mixtures of a variety of chemicals such as pesticides, paint, gasoline…other things for example that you might store in your garage or basement that might actually get all flooded out.” Add bacteria like E. coli from sewage treatment plants to the toxic stew, and it’s no wonder public health officials are sounding the alarm.

Tan advises watching out for nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and other symptoms of gastrointestinal upset, which can be especially debilitating and even life-threatening for infants, the elderly, and those with compromised immune systems.

Victims have been instructed to stay away from water as much as possible and, when possible, to wear protective gear like goggles, gloves, and boots. “Wading through standing water can potentially put people at risk,” says NYU Langone Medical Center’s Dr. Joseph Rahimian. “We saw this in Katrina; people were wading through stagnant water and they developed infections from Vibrio [bacteria].”

New York City acquires its water from groundwater reservoirs which flow downhill to the city, requiring no electricity, but other areas are less fortunate. People must boil water before drinking.

Foodborne Illnesses

Eating, however, is another problem. With no electricity in many areas, hungry victims turn to questionable food in their refrigerators.

“In 2003 there was a long blackout in August, and we saw a significant increase in foodborne illness in the days after,” says Tom Frieden, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The rule of thumb: don’t risk it. Better yet, learn how to preserve your food without electricity.

Threats in the Home

Even after the putrid floodwaters withdraw, residents are faced with moldy homes. This can result in allergic reactions, asthma attacks, bronchitis, and brain complications at worst.

Mold is present in 25 percent of American homes and 40 percent of our schools—and that’s without flooding. (If you’re worried about mold in your home, here are 4 ways to naturally purify the air in your home).

Threats come even from the air itself as people without electricity misuse generators, which cannot be used indoors without proper ventilation. Misuse can result in carbon monoxide poisoning.

There is no time better than the present for those of us who were fortunate enough to be out of Sandy’s path to learn how to prepare for hurricanes or any other disaster. It’s better to know than not to know.

Additional Sources:
NPR
Fox News
Environmental Health Journal

These Are The Food Distribution Locations In All Five Boroughs

(PIX11) The Salvation Army announced Thursday night that they would deliver food to victims of Hurricane Sandy at 14 locations in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. until they are no longer necessary.

The distribution centers are a joint effort between the Salvation Army and the Office of Emergency Management.

New York City presents a particularly complex set of logistics, especially in the wake of the damage and disruption caused by Hurricane Sandy,” said John Berglund, Director of Emergency Disaster Services for The Salvation Army Greater New York Division. “It has been so gratifying to see all of these constituencies pull together as one to address this critical need.”

“With the assistance of 400 National Guard troops, sites were established in public parks and playgrounds in the hardest hit areas of the city. During the course of the day, over 600,000 bottles of water and nearly 300,000 packaged meals were distributed to approximately 100,000 local residents. In addition, meals were delivered to the apartments and homes of shut-in residents in these areas.”

Queens:

  • Rockaways
  • Conch Playground – 51st Street & Rockaway Beach Boulevard
  • Hammel Playground – 84th Street & Rockaway Beach Boulevard
  • Red Fern House Playground – Redfern Avenue & Beach 12thStreet
  • Astoria
  • Hallets Cove – Vernon Blvd & 30th Road

Brooklyn

  • Coney Island
  • Surf Island Playground – West 25th Street & Surf Avenue
  • Red Hook
  • Coffey Park – 85 Richards Street

Manhattan

  • Chelsea
  • Chelsea Park – West 27th Street, between 9th & 10th Avenues
  • Lower East Side
  • Vladic Playground – East 10th Street, between C & D Avenues
  • Al Smith Playground – Catherine Street, between Cherry & Monroe Streets
  • Hamilton Fish – Pitt Street & East Houston Street
  • Other
  • Grand Street Settlement Houses – 413 Grand Street
  • Confucius Plaza on Division Street

Staten Island

  • Parking Lot – corner of Mill Road & New Dorp Lane
  • Empty Lot – corner of Yetman and Ylon Boulevard

Anyone who wishes to help those affected are urged to visit
www.salvationarmyusa.org or call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769). Donors may also
contribute $10 via their phone bill by text-messaging the word STORM to 80888, and confirming the donation with the word “Yes.”

Anarchy Along The Jersey Shore And On Long Island In The Aftermath Of Hurricane Sandy

Michael Snyder, Contributor
Activist Post

Hurricane Sandy is another reminder of just how incredibly fragile the thin veneer of civilization that we all take for granted on a daily basis really is. Many of the hardest hit areas along the Jersey shore and the coast of Long Island have descended into a state of anarchy. More than 7 million people live on Long Island, and millions more live along the Jersey shore and right now they are getting a taste of what life would be like during a total economic meltdown.

At the moment, there are still approximately 4.7 million homes and businesses that do not have power. Officials say that some of those homes and businesses may not have their power restored until the weekend of November 10th and 11th. Meanwhile, it is getting very cold at night. This weekend the low temperatures on Long Island are supposed to dip into the upper thirties.

There have been reports of people diving into dumpsters behind supermarkets in a desperate search for food, and there have been other reports of roaming gangs of criminals posing as officials from FEMA or Con Edison and then robbing families at gunpoint once they have gained entrance into their homes. If people will behave like this during a temporary emergency that lasts only a few days, what would they do during a total economic collapse? That is a frightening thing to think about.

Most gas stations along the Jersey shore and on Long Island are either totally out of gasoline or they don’t have any power to operate the gas pumps. It is estimated that more than half of all gas stations in New York City are closed at the moment, and officials say that more than 80 percent of all gas stations in New Jersey are not able to sell gas right now. So needless to say, the lines at the gas stations that remain open are horrific.

It is being reported that some people are waiting in line for hours for gasoline in some areas and that state troopers have actually been deployed at every gas station along the New Jersey Turnpike and the Garden State Parkway.

The following is how one New Jersey mayor described the situation

‘Gas lines are stretching for a couple of miles,’ said Anthony Ammiano, mayor of Freehold, N.J., who recalled the oil crisis of the 1970s. ‘It’s like the Jimmy Carter years. It’s a flashback of bad memories.’

There have even been reports of people literally fighting each other over gasoline…

‘It’s so crazy. Cars are pulling up and people are fighting each other. There is no gas around here,’ said Mena Aziz, who manages a Gulf Express station in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. ‘It’s been so busy.’

According to Breitbart, there have been continuous reports of “fistfights and people bringing guns to gas stations” on Twitter. The following are a couple of examples…

Just awful! RT @metrogypsy: Someone just pulled a knife at Greenpoint #gas station as line stretches with hours long wait #gettingrealFAST
— Camila Xavier (@camilaxavier) November 1, 2012

You know things are bad when you ask the gas station attendent ‘when do you think you’re going to get more gas?’ and he just laughs at you.
— Prede (@predederva) November 1, 2012

Unfortunately, authorities are projecting that the gas shortage may last for another week at least.

How angry and frustrated will people get by that time?

There are vast stretches of the Jersey Shore and the coast of Long Island that will never be the same again. The following is an excerpt from a comment that a reader of mine from Long Island left on one of my recent articles

I live in Massapequa NY …..No power to 95%. almost every home south of Merrick Road ( 1.5 miles from open water ) has been flooded. No electricity, no supermarkets in immediate area, no gas (approx 80% of gas stations closed on Long Island).

This was not just another storm. It was a life-altering event for millions of people.

Full Article

Coastal Town Of Sea Bright In NJ Devastated By Hurricane Sandy

(WPIX) We did not know it at the time, but what PIX11 cameras captured overnight – immediately after Hurricane Sandy blew across the Jersey Shore served as a preview to this:

Total and utter devastation in the coastal town of Sea Bright.

Alex Medina, who loves along the river, told PIX11 News, “Pretty much everything is gone now. My house is right on the other side of the bridge, probably nothing left.”

With the smell of natural gas lingered in the air, emergency crews worked overtime to clear tons of sand from Ocean Avenue.

Most if not all of this town’s residents are among the 2.6 million people who lost power.

Generator repairman Clark Brandt is a busy man.

“It’s just terrible. This is terrible. My daughter lives in Toms River. Her place was flooded out — the second floor. She was able to stay in the house, but she said it was like a war zone last night there,” said Brandt.

Here’s what’s not in dispute, sea bright emergency officials say the level of damage here is catastrophic.

When asked if the storm was as bad as he thought it would be, Sea Bright Deputy OEM Director C. Read Murphy told PIX11 News, “No, it’s about a hundred times worse. And i knew it was going to be bad. You and I have spoken quite a bit. And I’ve been doing this over 30 years, and uh, this is the most unbelievable thing I’ve seen in my life.”

Pentagon Wants Rescue Robots Built In Time For the Next “Natural Disaster”

(We here at Truth Frequency News really think they already have the technology, they’re just holding out on us – just like they know how to steer hurricanes, but still act all stupid when we ask why Chris Christie said “It took a sharp left turn – it worked well”.)

Susanne Posel, Contributor
Activist Post

In the wake of Tropical Storm Sandy, the Pentagon has requested that a team of “rescue robots” be engineered in time for the next “natural disaster”. The DARPA Robotics Challenge is putting out the call for a synthetic force that can be designed for autonomous thought; yet mitigate the risk to human life when preforming a rescue mission.

According to Defense Advance Research Projects Agency (DARPA):

Our best robotic tools are helping, but they are not yet robust enough to function in all environments and perform the basic tasks needed to mitigate a crisis situation. Even in degraded post-disaster situations, the environment is scaled to the human world, requiring navigation of human obstacles such as doors and stairs, manipulation of human objects such as vehicles and power tools, and recognition of common human objects such as levers and valves.

Staten Island Hurricane Sandy Relief

Hurricane Sandy had a devastating impact on Staten Island residents, the mainstream media has failed to report on much of the damage and death toll on Staten Island along with a lack of response and support from RedCross and our own Mayor. We are here to spread awareness and help people in our communities whose lives have been severely affected. This is a community effort being put together by people who have been directly hit by Sandy in order to help each other get through this crisis. For photo & story contributions please contact: [email protected]

 

If you have anything to spare you can donate here:

All donations will be donated (but not limited) to the blue collar communities of Oakwood Beach, New Dorp Beach, Midland Beach & South Beach. We will also need volunteers to assist in cleaning the neighborhoods of debris.

 

Staten Island Recovers

Kissam Ave, Oakwood Beach

FOR MORE PICTURES AND VIDEOS AND ANY UPDATES ON INFO CLICK HERE

Anarchy Along The Jersey Shore And On Long Island In The Aftermath Of Hurricane Sandy

Michael Snyder
Economic Collapse
Nov 2, 2012

Hurricane Sandy is another reminder of just how incredibly fragile the thin veneer of civilization that we all take for granted on a daily basis really is. Many of the hardest hit areas along the Jersey shore and the coast of Long Island have descended into a state of anarchy.

More than 7 million people live on Long Island, and millions more live along the Jersey shore and right now they are getting a taste of what life would be like during a total economic meltdown. At the moment, there are still approximately 4.7 million homes and businesses that do not have power. Officials say that some of those homes and businesses may not have their power restored until the weekend of November 10th and 11th. Meanwhile, it is getting very cold at night. This weekend the low temperatures on Long Island are supposed to dip into the upper thirties. There have been reports of people diving into dumpstersbehind supermarkets in a desperate search for food, and there have been other reports of roaming gangs of criminals posing as officials from FEMA or Con Edison and then robbing families at gunpoint once they have gained entrance into their homes. If people will behave like this during a temporary emergency that lasts only a few days, what would they do during a total economic collapse? That is a frightening thing to think about.

Most gas stations along the Jersey shore and on Long Island are either totally out of gasoline or they don’t have any power to operate the gas pumps. It is estimated that more than half of all gas stations in New York City are closed at the moment, and officials say that more than 80 percent of all gas stations in New Jersey are not able to sell gas right now. So needless to say, the lines at the gas stations that remain open are horrific.

It is being reported that some people are waiting in line for hours for gasoline in some areas and that state troopershave actually been deployed at every gas station along the New Jersey Turnpike and the Garden State Parkway.

The following is how one New Jersey mayor described the situation

“Gas lines are stretching for a couple of miles,” said Anthony Ammiano, mayor of Freehold, N.J., who recalled the oil crisis of the 1970s. “It’s like the Jimmy Carter years. It’s a flashback of bad memories.”

There have even been reports of people literally fighting each other over gasoline…

“It’s so crazy. Cars are pulling up and people are fighting each other. There is no gas around here,” said Mena Aziz, who manages a Gulf Express station in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. “It’s been so busy.”

According to Breitbart, there have been continuous reports of “fistfights and people bringing guns to gas stations” on Twitter. The following are a couple of examples…

Just awful! RT @metrogypsy: Someone just pulled a knife at Greenpoint #gas station as line stretches with hours long wait #gettingrealFAST

— Camila Xavier (@camilaxavier) November 1, 2012

You know things are bad when you ask the gas station attendent “when do you think you’re going to get more gas?” and he just laughs at you.

— Prede (@predederva) November 1, 2012

Unfortunately, authorities are projecting that the gas shortage may last for another week at least.

How angry and frustrated will people get by that time?

There are vast stretches of the Jersey Shore and the coast of Long Island that will never be the same again. The following is an excerpt from a comment that a reader of mine from Long Island left on one of my recent articles

I live in Massapequa NY …..No power to 95%. almost every home south of Merrick Road ( 1.5 miles from open water ) has been flooded. No electricity, no supermarkets in immediate area, no gas (approx 80% of gas stations closed on Long Island).

This was not just another storm. It was a life-altering event for millions of people.

Unfortunately, just as we have seen after every other major storm in recent years, looters are taking advantage of the chaos caused by Hurricane Sandy.

According to the New York Post, a number of arrests for looting have already been made on Long Island…

In the Rockaways, lowlifes were sneaking into clothing stores and cleaning out pizzerias. Two men and a woman were arrested for robbing a BP gas station on Beach Channel Drive, three men and one woman were cuffed for pillaging a Radio Shack on Beach 88th Street, and two people were arrested for raiding a clothing store near Beach 86th Street, cops said. Stores were emptied along a two-block stretch of Mermaid Avenue in Coney Island. Seven people were busted.

Over on Coney Island, looting appeared to be out of control during the immediate aftermath of the storm…

Thieves broke in to the badly damaged Mega Aid Pharmacy on Mermaid Avenue and reportedly stole more than 10,000 pharmaceutical items, including prescription drugs.

“The water went away and these people started walking down the streets and just robbed stores,” a pharmacy worker told HuffPo’s Andy Campbell.

Manager Stan Gutkin said the major heist essentially “breaks the business.”

Looters reportedly also targeted banks, other shops, and other pharmacies.

And residents are noticing.

“People are turning on each other — they’re attacking each other,” Ocean Towers resident Dena Wells told Campbell.

Amazingly, a number of not-so-smart looters have actually been displaying their looted goods on Twitter. Just check out the shocking photos in this article.

But most people living in the areas that were most affected by Hurricane Sandy are decent people that just want some assistance. One resident of Hoboken, New Jersey became so frustrated that he inflated an air mattress and used it to float down to city hall in an attempt to get some answers…

Nearly 20,000 people have been trapped at home in the New Jersey city of Hoboken, just across the Hudson River from New York City, amid accusations that officials were slow to deliver food and water.

One man blew up an air mattress and floated to City Hall, demanding to know why supplies had not reached residents – at least a quarter of homes there are flooded and 90% do not have power.

Just like we saw after Hurricane Katrina, the response by the federal government and by big aid agencies such as the Red Cross has been very slow. In fact, Staten Island Borough President James Molinaro has gone so far as to call the Red Cross an “absolute disgrace” and is urging people that live in his area to quit giving money to them…

“You know, I went to a shelter Monday night after the storm. People were coming in with no socks, with no shoes. They were in desperate need. Their housing was destroyed. They were crying. Where was the Red Cross? Isn’t that their function? They collect millions of dollars. Whenever there’s a drive in Staten Island, we give openly and honestly. Where are they? Where are they? I was at the South Shore yesterday, people were buried in their homes. There the dogs are trying to find bodies. The people there, the neighbors who had no electricity, were making soup. Making soup. It’s very emotional because the lack of a response. The lack of a response. They’re supposed to be here….They should be on the front lines fighting, and helping the people.”

If this is how angry and frustrated that people become over a temporary disaster, how angry and frustrated would they get if there was a total economic meltdown that was permanent?

Sadly, the truth is that what we are seeing during the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy is just a very small preview of what is coming on a national level.

Our economy is a complete and total mess right now, and things are going to get a whole lot worse.

When unemployment starts skyrocketing again and large segments of the population realize that there is no hope for a turnaround, many of them are going to totally give in to despair and become very desperate.

And as we are seeing along the Jersey Shore and on Long Island right now, desperate people do desperate things.

That is why I am constantly pounding on the need to prepare for what is ahead. There are signs of social decay all around us, and most Americans are not equipped to deal with the pressures that come with a major emergency. When things totally fall apart, you don’t want your family to be totally unprepared and surrounded by millions of angry and desperate people.

Hopefully Hurricane Sandy will serve as a wake up call for millions of American families. Time is definitely running out, and we all need to get prepared while we still can.

Mobile FEMA Unit Dispatched to Log Disaster Victims into ‘the System’

Hundreds lined up to be the first to get logged into the system Friday morning as a mobile FEMA truck showed up on Coney Island.

By Shepard Ambellas
theintelhub.com
November 2, 2012

CONEY ISLAND, NEW YORK — After the government sponsored terror attacks took place in September of 2001 , America was shaken to the core. Media hype and terror rhetoric filled the airwaves. We had a new enemy.

According to Wikipedia;

Following the September 11, 2001, attacks, Congress passed the Homeland Security Act of 2002, which created the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to better coordinate among the different federal agencies that deal with law enforcement, disaster preparedness and recovery, border protection and civil defense. FEMA was absorbed into DHS effective March 1, 2003. As a result, FEMA became part of the Emergency Preparedness and Response Directorate of Department of Homeland Security, and employs more than 2,600 full-time employees. It became the FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Agency again on March 31, 2007, but still remained in DHS.

The fraudulent Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) revitalized offshoot FEMA arrived Friday morning with a Winnebago in the disaster struck region of Coney Island to solve all problems. That’s right everything will now be ok. The unit is there to help storm victims register with FEMA to see if they qualify for aid or possible a toxic FEMA trailer to live in.

This magical Winnebago gives storm victims a chance to register with FEMA as hundred awaited the arrival of what is being called the “city’s first mobile FEMA disaster center”. The mobile unit will change locations throughout the day and coming weeks, trying to reach as many victims as possible to get them logged.

FEMA announced that victims can also register by phone or email making it easy for some who have amenities.

The FEMA spokesman was quoted saying, “We want to get people into the system” showing how displaced populations are essentially tagged and tracked by FEMA.

Officials say it could be another week before power is restored in areas as food and supplies remain scarce citywide. Some looting has been reported.

New Jersey kicks out Sandy volunteers because they aren’t unionized

rt.com
November 2, 2012

Utility workers from across the US are descending on the Northeastern states left ravaged by Superstorm Sandy, but some volunteers making the trek are being told they can’t pitch in since they don’t belong to a union.

According to a report published late Thursday by WAFF News out of Seaside Heights, crews coming to assist all the way from Alabama’s Decatur Utilities were turned away because they aren’t unionized, despite making the 800-mile jaunt to lend a hand.

WAFF quotes Decatur worker Derrick Moore, who tells the network that him and his colleagues “are frustrated being told, in essence, ‘thanks, but no thanks.’”

Left with nothing to do in New Jersey, Moore and other members of the Decatur team are reportedly waiting in Roanaoke, Virginia to see if Seaside Heights authorities will change their mind. Meanwhile, though, millions of residents up and down the East Coast remain without power after a powerful tropical storm downed power lines and flooded streets from North Carolina to New England.

According to the latest figures available early Friday, the death toll from the frankenstorm may already be close to hitting 100, and recovery efforts are expected to continue for weeks, if not months. At the same time, though, things may be off to a slower start in New Jersey if nonunionized volunteers are refused any further.

Bill Yell, a spokesman for Alabama’s Huntsville Utilities, tells AL.com that nine of his employees are currently helping with recovery from the storm, but not in New Jersey where he claims they were told they weren’t needed. Instead, his crew of unionized workers has been volunteering their services with Long Island Power Authority in New York.

According to ABC News, more than 40,000 workers from utility companies across 49 states have been dispatched to the East Coast to aid in recovery efforts, with the US Air Force now assisting by moving dozens of utility vehicles onboard cargo planes.

On Thursday, forecasting firm Eqecat estimated the damage from the storm to be close to $50 billion.

Unrest growing among NJ, NY citizens: Dumpster diving for food, fist fights over fuel, tempers flare in Sandy aftermath

By Mike Adams
Natural News
Nov 2, 2012

The first 72 hours after a natural disaster are the “polite” hours. Residents operate under the illusion that Big Government will soon save them with emergency supplies: food, water, fuel, clothing and more. So they follow the rules and “play nice.”

After about the third day, all those social niceties start to erode. People are hungry and angry.

There’s a feeling of desperation and even abandonment. What seemed to be a polite society two days earlier suddenly becomes more sinister.

The survival needs of individuals begin to outweigh social boundaries, and what emerges is desperation… even panic.

“Dwindling gasoline supplies are causing frayed nerves as the region endures its third full day with massive power outages.” reports Fox News.

“Frustration with gas supplies topped the list of issues causing tensions to boil over in New Jersey, New York and Connecticut, the states hardest hit by power outages in the wake of superstorm Sandy.

Residents jockeyed for fuel at the few stations still pumping, searched store shelves in vain for batteries, struggled with sporadic cell phone service and found themselves unable to buy necessities at supermarkets.”

State troopers have now been deployed to gas stations in an effort to head off near-riots as citizens lose patience and tempers flare.

On Twitter, fist fights are being reported over fuel shortages. Police have had to draw guns on some people, reports Brietbart.com.

That article includes posts from Twitter users:

You know things are bad when you ask the gas station attendent “when do you think you’re going to get more gas?” and he just laughs at you. – Prede (@predederva) November 1, 2012

Just awful! RT @metrogypsy: Someone just pulled a knife at Greenpoint #gas station as line stretches with hours long wait #gettingrealFAST – Camila Xavier (@camilaxavier) November 1, 2012

Watching the breakdown of society at a gas station on Long Island. #sandysucks – Christina (@wooly_says) November 1, 2012

There are also tweets from some users who are intelligent preppers… like this one from JohnnyRH:

I live in Utah and the people here are big into “prepping”… I have relatives in NJ and just last week we were talking and they thought I was nuts to own guns, store fuel and water and have a generator.

Most people are totally blind to what chaos will come with a really large power grid failure over half or all of the country. It will take little more than a week for all hell to break loose and riots will be the norm.

“We’re going to DIE!”

Another report from ABC News reveals the desperation and panic now forming among residents in Staten Island.

“We’re going to die! We’re going to freeze! We got 90-year-old people!” Donna Solli told visiting officials. “You don’t understand. You gotta get your trucks down here on the corner now. It’s been three days!”

The situation is so bad that even the Red Cross is being blamed for not showing up with supplies:

“This is America, not a third world nation. We need food, we need clothing,” Staten Island Borough President Jim Molinaro said today. “My advice to the people of Staten Island is: Don’t donate to the American Red Cross. Put their money elsewhere.” (ABC News)

NBC News reports:

Staten Island officials had some choice words Thursday to describe what they said was a feeble disaster-relief response to people left dying, homeless and hungry in the New York City borough hit particularly hard by Sandy.

Staten Island’s top elected official blasted the American Red Cross response as “an absolute disgrace” and went so far as to urge its residents not to donate to the largely volunteer agency.

No gas for a week, no power for two

This situation, by the way, is only going to get FAR WORSE before it gets better. CNBC reports gas shortages will continue for at least a week, possibly longer.

That’s seven more days even while desperation has already taken hold on day three!

And power? Con Edison says it will be another 10 days before power is restored to the majority of customers currently in the dark.

As long as the power is out, gas stations can’t pump gas, and that means continued gas shortages.

That, in turn, means more desperation, starvation and even panic as residents can’t use vehicles to acquire food and supplies.

The American way of life, remember, is almost unimaginable without gasoline. Half the population seems physically incapable of walking anywhere these days, and almost nobody own bicycles anymore.

Things are going to get a lot worse over the next few days

What happens when millions of people packed into high-density cities can’t get food, fuel or electricity?

People get desperate, of course. Desperation is about to set in. In the days ahead, you’re going to see more fights and even weapons brought to bear in real-life survival scenarios.

The federal government will predictably fail to reach people with the help they need, and people who neglected to prepare will find themselves in ever-more-desperate circumstances.

This is a time when nearly everybody suddenly realizes gee, it sure would have been smart to have been a prepper.

What’s the value of having emergency food, fuel, a water filter, batteries and a fully loaded Remington shotgun in the hours after a superstorm? Priceless.

Preparedness is the solution

What’s the solution to all this frustration and panic? Preparedness.

If the people of Staten Island or NYC had been prepared for the storm that they knew was approaching, they wouldn’t be in a state of desperation right now!

If they had stored some of their own food, fuel, water and emergency supplies, they wouldn’t be panicked for the Red Cross to show up and save them.

If they had intelligently planned ahead and taken action based on the seven days of dire weather predictions that preceded the storm, they wouldn’t need to beg for big government to bail them out!

The answer to disasters like Sandy is to be a prepper.

Preppers are the new prophets

In the wake of Sandy, preppers suddenly seem like geniuses.

While being ridiculed by the rest of the population for as long as we can all remember, preppers are the ones still standing in the aftermath of the storm.

They’re the ones you don’t see on the news, begging for help and panicking over the situation, because the preppers are sitting in their homes, eating their stored food, drinking their filtered water, double-checking their shotgun loads and staying off the streets.

Preppers are the ones NOT looting, NOT complaining about the Red Cross, and NOT diving in dumpsters to find food while waiting around for the government to show up and save them.

Preppers are the new prophets. And those who failed to prepare are the new homeless.

New York City Council member warns Sandy looters will face extreme repercussions

Cathy Hayes
irishcentral.com
November 2, 2012

As New York City recovers from the effects of Hurricane Sandy there have been mounting reports of looting in areas where there are power outages and abandoned buildings.

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn said those found to be looting during this difficult time for New York should except exceptionally harsh punishment. Speaking in Coney Island on Thursday she asked people to do the right thing.

“They really shouldn’t prey on their neighbors in these worst of times and anyone who is caught looting during this storm should have the book thrown at them in a way that is extreme.

Read more

SHOCK: 72 Hours After Grid-Down: Starvation, Supply Shortages, Food Lines, No Clean Water, No Gas, Transportation Standstill

By Mac Slavo
SHTFPlan.com
Nov 2, 2012

A recent study noted that the majority of people have enough food in their pantries to feed their household for about three days and that seemingly stable societies are really just nine meals from anarchy.

With most of us dependent on just-in-time transportation systems to always be available, few ever consider the worst case scenario.

For tens of thousands of east coast residents that worst case scenario is now playing out in real-time. No longer are images of starving people waiting for government handouts restricted to just the third-world.

In the midst of crisis, once civilized societies will very rapidly descend into chaos when essential infrastructure systems collapse.

Though the National Guard was deployed before the storm even hit, there is simply no way for the government to coordinate a response requiring millions of servings of food, water and medical supplies

Many east coast residents who failed to evacuate or prepare reserve supplies ahead of the storm are being forced to fend for themselves.

Frustration and anger have taken hold, as residents have no means of acquiring food or gas and thousands of trucks across the region remain stuck in limbo.

Limited electricity has made it possible for some to share their experiences:

Via Twitter:

  • I was in chaos tonite tryin to get groceries…lines for shuttle buses, only to get to the no food left & closing early (link)
  • I’m not sure what has shocked me more, all the communities around me destroyed, or the 5 hour lines for gas and food. (link)
  • Haven’t slept or ate well in a few days. Hope things start getting better around here soon (link)
  • These days a lot of people are impatient because they’re used to fast things. Fast food, fast internet, fast lines and fast shipping etc. (link)
  • Glad Obama is off to Vegas after his 90 minute visit. Gas lines are miles long.. Running out of food and water. Great Job (link)
  • Went to the Grocery store and lines were crazy but nail salon was empty so I’ve got a new gel manicure and some Korean junk food (link)
  • So f*cking devastated right now. Smell burning houses. People fighting for food. Pitch darkness. I may spend the night in rockaway to help (link)

Things are starting to become horrific for the unprepared, as food lines stretch for miles and Meals-Ready-To-Eat are in short supply:


(above images via Gothamist)

With mass transit out of service and no gas, residents have no choice but to commute by foot.

Survival Blog founder James Rawles has referred to the masses of starving people who will roam the streets in a post-collapse world as the Golden Horde – here’s a small taste of what that will look like:

The situation has become so desperate that some have been forced to resort to rummaging through the garbage for food:

Video:

“We’ve seen everyone here from the elderly, to families with children…”

 

 

A simple 72 hour survival kit and some basic hurricane preparedness would have prevented days of heartache for residents of stricken areas.

The vast majority of those waiting in mile-long long food lines, rummaging through the trash, and criticizing their government officials for a slow and insufficient response have no one to blame but themselves.

This may be harsh – but it’s true.

We wish all those having a difficult time dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy the best going forward. Perhaps it will be a wake-up call for the rest of the nation.

Hurricane Sandy, while disastrous, is not nearly as bad as it could have been.

It has happened before. It will happen again. Prepare or suffer the consequences.

‘We Need Food, We Need Clothing’ Staten Island residents launch desperate plea for assistance

November 2, 2012NEW YORK – The residents of Staten Island are pleading for help from elected officials, begging for gasoline, food, and clothing three days after Sandy slammed the New York City borough.

“We’re going to die! We’re going to freeze! We got 90-year-old people!” Donna Solli told visiting officials. “You don’t understand. You gotta get your trucks down here on the corner now. It’s been three days!” Staten Island was one of the hardest-hit communities in New York City. More than 80,000 residents are still without power. Many are homeless, and at least 19 people died on Staten Island because of the storm.

One of the devastated neighborhoods was overwhelmed by a violent surge of water. Residents described a super-sized wave as high as 20 feet, with water rushing into the streets like rapids. Staten Island resident Mike Abuzzio’s home is completely gone, with only his floor boards remaining. He, his wife and their two young daughters have been staying with relatives. “My youngest daughter yesterday said, ‘Daddy, I want to go,’” Abuzzio told ABC News. “I told her, ‘It’s going to be awhile, hon.’ She doesn’t understand. She’s 6.” In the rubble that was once his home, Abuzzio found one clean, intact plate of Christmas china. He said that plate will be special at Christmastime and will be used specifically for his mother’s cookies.

For 48 hours after the storm, search teams were hunting for two Staten Island brothers, just 2- and 4-years-old. They were swept out of their mother’s arms when waves caused by storm surges crashed into the family’s SUV. Their small bodies were found today at the end of a dead-end street. Their parents were at the scene where the bodies were discovered.

Staten Island officials sounded increasingly desperate today, asking when supplies will arrive. They blasted the Red Cross for not being there when it counted. “This is America, not a third world nation. We need food, we need clothing,” Staten Island Borough President Jim Molinaro said today. “My advice to the people of Staten Island is: Don’t donate the American Red Cross. Put their money elsewhere.”

The Red Cross and the National Guard arrived in the area late Tuesday and are distributing food, water and gas – and city officials say things are much better. Molinaro urged New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg Wednesday to cancel Sunday’s New York City Marathon. The race’s staging area is on Staten Island and Molinaro said it would be “crazy, asinine,” to have the race after what has happened. “My God. What we have here is terrible, a disaster,” Molinaro said Wednesday. “If they want to race, let them race with themselves. This is no time for a parade. A marathon is a parade. Now is the time to put your shoulder to the wheel. If they want to prepare for something, let them prepare for the election, not a marathon. Do you realize how many police officers you need for a marathon?” he asked. “There are people looting stores on Midland Avenue. There is looting taking place in the homes on the South Shore that were destroyed. That is where we need the police.”

Gasoline shortages in northeast U.S. highlights how quickly modern societies will unravel following disasters

November 2, 2012NEW YORK – Widespread gas shortages stirred fears among residents and disrupted some rescue and emergency services on Thursday as the New York region struggled to return to a semblance of normalcy after being ravaged by Hurricane Sandy. Tiny increments of progress — some subway and bus lines were back in service — were overshadowed by new estimates of the storm’s financial cost, struggles to restore power, and by the discovery of more bodies in flooded communities.

The lines of cars waiting for gas at a Sunoco here ran in three directions: a mile-long line up the Garden State Parkway, a half-mile line along Vauxhall Road, and another, including a fleet of mail trucks that needed to refuel before resuming their rounds, snaking through a back entrance.

The scene was being replayed across the state as drivers waited in lines that ran hundreds of vehicles deep, requiring state troopers and local police to protect against exploding tempers. “I’ve been pumping gas for 36 hours, I pumped 1,500 gallons,” said Abhishek Soni, the owner of an Exxon in Montclair, where disputes on the line Wednesday night had become so heated that Mr. Soni called the police and turned off the pumps for 45 minutes to restore calm. “My nose, my mouth is bleeding from the fumes. The fighting just makes it worse.”

Four days after Hurricane Sandy, the effort to secure enough gas for the region moved to the forefront of recovery work. The problems affected even New York City, where the Taxi Commission warned that the suddenly indispensable fleet of yellow cabs would thin significantly Friday because of the fuel shortage. City officials said they had reached an agreement with a major supplier Thursday night that would ensure emergency operations — fire, police, sanitation and work by the parks department to clean up downed trees — would continue uninterrupted.

Though Thursday marked a return to routine for many who ride the subway to work or celebrated the resumption of power, the scenes of long lines, fistfights at gas stations and siphoning at parking lots highlighted the difficult, uneven slog to recovery. The losses from the storm will approach $50 billion, according to an early estimate from economists at Moody’s Analytics — about $30 billion in property damage, the rest in lost economic activity like meals and canceled flights. At the same time the death toll in New York City rose to 38, as rescuers continued to discover bodies while combing through coastal wreckage. Among them were the bodies of two boys, 2 and 4, who had been torn from their mother by raging floodwaters on Staten Island on Monday night.

The lack of power continued to bedevil efforts to address the damage. About 43 percent of customers in New Jersey and about 16 percent in New York State remained without electricity, and Officials said that they expected power to be restored to all of Manhattan by Saturday. Those issues were only aggravated by the increasingly short supply of gas, particularly given that many suburban residents in New Jersey and elsewhere were heading to the stations to fuel generators, which provided the lone source of power and heat to homes across the region.

According to figures from AAA, roughly 60 percent of stations in New Jersey and 70 percent of stations on Long Island were closed. At stations that were open, nerves frayed. Fights broke out at the block-long Hess station on 10th Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, forcing the Police Department to send three officers to keep the peace, a police official said. The ports and refineries that supply much of the region’s gas had been shut down in advance of the storm and were damaged by it. That disrupted deliveries to gas stations that had power to pump it. But the bigger problem was that many stations and storage facilities remained without power.

Disasters Create Bigger, Not Better, Government

Amity Shlaes
bloomberg.com
November 1, 2012

Whew. That was the general reaction when President Barack Obama told waterlogged New Jersey that “we are here for you.” After all, these days, a president is expected to “be here.”

Federal rescue is the American Way. Being there starts with helping to clear the flooded metropolitan-area tunnels between New Jersey and New York. But the concept extends to bridges, roads and all the other infrastructure challenges up and down the Atlantic coast after Hurricane Sandy.

Such rescue seems like a no-brainer during crises.

Read more

 

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